Microscopy

Advancement in energy, environment and biology research relies heavily on micro-, nano- and atomic-scale chemical and structural imaging. Many microscopy instruments have high-resolution imaging capabilities including complementary chemical, structural and phase information, in-situ imaging in native environments and imaging of dynamic processes with high temporal-resolution. See a complete list of Microscopy instruments.

Resources and Techniques

  • Nanoscale and sub-nanoscale imaging allows users to elucidate chemical processes and acquire structural data for a variety of samples such as nanostructures and cell-surface proteins.
  • Tomography yields three-dimensional reconstruction of transmission electron microscopy images generated for biological samples as well as for soft materials and samples with 3D structural heterogeneity.
  • Environmental particle analysis offers knowledge about non-volatile atmospheric particle composition and hydration properties using high-pressure scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis capability.
  • Environmental mode imaging techniques enable sample preservation to eliminate extensive preparation procedures that can introduce artifacts and make possible live-cell imaging and in situ imaging in liquids or controlled gas environments with high resolution microscopy.
  • Dynamic imaging capability enables real-time studies of nanosecond-scale dynamic processes with unprecedented spatial resolution, such as protein-protein interactions, with contrast at the single-molecule level.

Quiet Wing for Advanced Microscopy
Seven microscopes are housed in the Quiet Wing, a space specially designed to reduce external factors, such as vibrations and electromagnetic fields, that can impede capture of high-resolution images. Read more about the Quiet Wing and its instrumentation.

A new DTEM – Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope – is under development at EMSL in collaboration with scientific colleagues at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. It will be housed in the Quiet Wing. To learn more about this system, the science it will advance and its historical development, visit the DTEM page.

Description

Capability Details

• Electron microscopes with tomography, cryo, scanning, photoemission and high-resolution (sub-nanometer) imaging capabilities
• Focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopes for specialized sample preparation and three-dimensional topographic and chemical imaging
• Nuclear magnetic resonance microscopy with 10-40-_m resolution to study the anatomy, metabolism and transport processes of live cell cultures, biofilms and tissue samples
• Dual Raman confocal microscope for analysis of radiological samples
• Single-molecule fluorescence tools to study molecular interactions in real time
• Scanning probe microscopy with capabilities ranging from examination of dynamic nanoscale processes in condensed environments to high resolution studies of catalysis materials in ultra-high vacuum.

 

Instruments

The LEAP® 4000 XHR local electrode atom probe tomography instrument enabled the first-ever comprehensive and accurate 3-D chemical imaging studies...
Custodian(s): Arun Devaraj, Daniel Perea
This FEI Tecnai T-12 cryo-transmission electron microscope (TEM) complements EMSL's broader microscopy suite and JEOL 2010 analytical high-...
Custodian(s): Alice Dohnalkova
The Asylum MFP-3D BIO is a versatile atomic force microscope (AFM) that combines molecular resolution imaging and picoNewton force-based...
Custodian(s): Kevin M. Rosso
Housed in EMSL's RadEMSL (Radiochemistry Annex), the field emission electron microprobe (EMP) enables chemical analysis and imaging of radionuclides...
Custodian(s): Bruce Arey
The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) is a new-generation SEM that can image samples under controlled environments and temperatures...
Custodian(s): Alexander Laskin, Scott Lea

Publications

A method is introduced for simple calculation of charge transfer between very large solvated organic dimers (fullerenes here) from isolated dimer...
Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are appealing candidates for analytical separation of heavy metal ions from waste water and...
The interactions between proteins and surfaces are critical to a number of important processes including biomineralization, the biocompatibility of...
Many TiO2 applications (e.g., in heterogeneous catalysis) involve contact with ambient atmosphere and/or water. The resulting hydroxylation can...
We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) interlaboratory study on the measurement of composition in...

Science Highlights

Posted: January 26, 2016
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, or PNNL, and Argonne National Laboratory have developed a "vitamin mimic" – a molecule that...
Posted: December 29, 2015
The Science A wide variety of microbes thrive at high temperatures such as those found in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. Archaeal...
Posted: November 09, 2015
The Science Asymmetrical growth is a property of many types of cells in organisms as diverse as algae, fungi, plants and animals. Among the...
Posted: November 03, 2015
Achieving a holistic, molecular-level understanding of cellular machinery and communication, microbial community dynamics, and other interactions...
Posted: September 23, 2015
The Science Natural organic matter (NOM) is a mixture of organic molecules derived primarily from the natural decay of plant matter. Understanding...

Instruments

Electrical, optical and mechanical properties of inorganic nanostructures have strong relationships with their morphologies. For example, one-...
The first goal of this research program is to develop a robust method to quantify the atomic scale changes in structure, composition and bonding that...
The goal of this proposal is to understand the microstructural evolution during non-equilibrium, rapid solidification of a molten magnesium-aluminum-...
The goal of this proposal is to understand the microstructural evolution during non-equilibrium, rapid solidification of a molten magnesium-aluminum-...
Atmospheric aerosols affect the climate directly by absorbing and scattering radiation and indirectly by impacting the properties and lifetimes of...

Advancement in energy, environment and biology research relies heavily on micro-, nano- and atomic-scale chemical and structural imaging. Many microscopy instruments have high-resolution imaging capabilities including complementary chemical, structural and phase information, in-situ imaging in native environments and imaging of dynamic processes with high temporal-resolution. See a complete list of Microscopy instruments.

Resources and Techniques

  • Nanoscale and sub-nanoscale imaging allows users to elucidate chemical processes and acquire structural data for a variety of samples such as nanostructures and cell-surface proteins.
  • Tomography yields three-dimensional reconstruction of transmission electron microscopy images generated for biological samples as well as for soft materials and samples with 3D structural heterogeneity.
  • Environmental particle analysis offers knowledge about non-volatile atmospheric particle composition and hydration properties using high-pressure scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis capability.
  • Environmental mode imaging techniques enable sample preservation to eliminate extensive preparation procedures that can introduce artifacts and make possible live-cell imaging and in situ imaging in liquids or controlled gas environments with high resolution microscopy.
  • Dynamic imaging capability enables real-time studies of nanosecond-scale dynamic processes with unprecedented spatial resolution, such as protein-protein interactions, with contrast at the single-molecule level.

Quiet Wing for Advanced Microscopy
Seven microscopes are housed in the Quiet Wing, a space specially designed to reduce external factors, such as vibrations and electromagnetic fields, that can impede capture of high-resolution images. Read more about the Quiet Wing and its instrumentation.

A new DTEM – Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope – is under development at EMSL in collaboration with scientific colleagues at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. It will be housed in the Quiet Wing. To learn more about this system, the science it will advance and its historical development, visit the DTEM page.

Direct Delocalization for Calculating Electron Transfer in Fullerenes.

Abstract: 

A method is introduced for simple calculation of charge transfer between very large solvated organic dimers (fullerenes here) from isolated dimer calculations. The individual monomers in noncentrosymmetric dimers experience different chemical
environments, so that the dimers do not necessarily represent bulk-like molecules. Therefore, we apply a delocalizing bias directly to the Fock matrix of the dimer system, and verify that this is almost as accurate as self-consistent solvation. As large molecules like fullerenes have a plethora of excited states, the initially excited state orbitals are thermally populated, so that the rate is obtained as a thermal average over Marcus thermal transfers.

Citation: 
Arntsen CD, R Reslan, S Hernandez, Y Gao, and D Neuhauser.2013."Direct Delocalization for Calculating Electron Transfer in Fullerenes."International Journal of Quantum Chemistry 113(15):1885–1889. doi:10.1002/qua.24409
Authors: 
CD Arntsen
R Reslan
S Hernez
Y Gao
D Neuhauser
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2013

Magnetic Separation Dynamics of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles.

Abstract: 

Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are appealing candidates for analytical separation of heavy metal ions from waste water and separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. This work studies the separation dynamics and investigates the appropriate magnetic-field gradients. A dynamic study of colloidal MNPs was performed for steady-state flow. Measurements were conducted to record the separation time of particles as a function of magnetic field gradient. The drag and magnetic forces play a significant role on the separation time. A drop in saturation magnetization and variation of particle size occurs after surface functionalization of the MNPs; these are the primary factors that affect the separation time and velocity of the MNPs. The experimental results are correlated to a theoretical one-dimensional model.

Citation: 
Kaur M, H Zhang, and Y Qiang.2013."Magnetic Separation Dynamics of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles."IEEE Magnetics Letters 4:4000204. doi:10.1109/LMAG.2013.2271744
Authors: 
M Kaur
H Zhang
Y Qiang
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2013

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(509) 371-6233

Dr. Lea has over 20 years of experience with research related to surface science. His primary focus areas are related to the application of electron spectroscopy and scanning probes to study chemical and geochemical processes, biomolecular...