This study revealed the structure and function of a complex cellulose-degrading microbial community, which could lead to greater use of plant...
By providing critical guidance on coating designs for improving the performance of silicon anodes, these findings could enable the development of...
By providing a more complete understanding of the chemical nature of soot particles, this research could ultimately lead to improved climate model...
CO2 injected in deep subsurface environments likely causes shifts in the microbial community and could improve overall efficiency of CO2...
A new study reveals novel insights into enzymes important for genome stability and gene regulation related to plant development that could enhance...
EMSL Director Allison Campbell interviews EMSL Lead Scientist Tim Scheibe about multiscale modeling and high-performance computing. Campbell talked...

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

A team of PNNL scientists doing some of their research at EMSL developed a unified theory and unified multiscale model that simulates water flow at all scales. The new approach is important for understanding water cycling and its effect on agriculture, water conservation and climate changes.
EMSL scientists Patrick Reardon and Karl Mueller studied the protein structures that make up nanowires on some bacteria. These tiny electrical wires contribute to rock and dirt formation. Their findings have implications for producing energy, recycling Earth's carbon and miniaturizing computers.
Virtually tour EMSL's Radiochemistry Annex, a facility designed for the understanding of the chemical fate and transport of radionuclides in terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems.
EMSL received first-year funding of almost $1M from the DOE Office of Science for a pilot program to develop imaging approaches to understand how microbes sense and respond to their environment on the molecular to cellular scale. EMSL Scientist James Evans will lead the multi-institutional project team.

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