Lithium (Li) metal has long been considered one of the most attractive anode materials, but large-scale application of high-energy rechargeable Li...
This study presents a unified multiscale model that uses a single set of equations to simultaneously simulate hydrological processes in an ecosystem...
This study revealed the structure and function of a complex cellulose-degrading microbial community, which could lead to greater use of plant...
By providing critical guidance on coating designs for improving the performance of silicon anodes, these findings could enable the development of...
By providing a more complete understanding of the chemical nature of soot particles, this research could ultimately lead to improved climate model...
EMSL’s call for fiscal year 2016 proposals opened Jan. 7 and offers two opportunities for submitting research projects: Science Theme Research and...

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

EMSL received first-year funding of almost $1M from the DOE Office of Science for a pilot program to develop imaging approaches to understand how microbes sense and respond to their environment on the molecular to cellular scale. EMSL Scientist James Evans will lead the multi-institutional project team.
Alex Guenther, EMSL’s Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme lead and a PNNL Laboratory Fellow, is impacting the atmospheric science community and has the science and journal citations to prove it.
The American Chemical Society has recognized EMSL Senior Research Scientist Kim Hixson with its Withycombe-Charalambous Graduate Student Symposium Award for her research using multi-omics to bioengineer biomass plants to enhance the production of biochemicals and biofuels. A doctoral candidate at Washington State University in Pullman, Hixson presented her research at the 2014 ACS Spring Meeting in Dallas last March.
A team of PNNL scientists doing some of their research at EMSL developed a unified theory and unified multiscale model that simulates water flow at all scales. The new approach is important for understanding water cycling and its effect on agriculture, water conservation and climate changes.

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