Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can...
Climate change is expected to cause oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean to expand and intensify. This study examines potential effects on...
Understanding how water and chemicals flow in soils is important for many practical problems such as assessing the risk of groundwater contamination...
Understanding the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere could improve the accuracy of climate models. A new study with Stony Brook University...
Technetium-99 is a common radioactive contaminant in groundwater at nuclear waste reprocessing sites. This study examines ways iron and sulfide...
EMSL director Allison Campbell talks with EMSL scientist Alex Laskin about his research in EMSL's Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme area....

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

Chemists have unexpectedly made two differently colored crystals – one orange, the other blue – from one chemical in the same flask while studying a special kind of molecular connection called an agostic bond. EMSL's supercomputer Chinook was used to perform theoretical calculations on the crystalline structures. The researchers were studying agostic bonds as part of a project to make liquid fuels from carbon dioxide to replace fuels from oil. Read the PNNL news release.
To better understand site-specific processes, properties, and conditions controlling uranium bioremediation, scientists developed faster, more detailed simulations, maximizing the use of broader Rifle Site field experiment data.
The effects of biogeochemical and geochemical processes in the ground under us are on massive scales. Scientists working at EMSL are getting a handle on these gigantic macroscopic processes by focusing on the microscopic scale. By creating micromodels and incorporating supercomputer simulations, researchers are gaining a better understanding of the processes that affect our entire ecosystem.
Alex Guenther, EMSL’s Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme lead and a PNNL Laboratory Fellow, is impacting the atmospheric science community and has the science and journal citations to prove it.

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