Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can...
Climate change is expected to cause oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean to expand and intensify. This study examines potential effects on...
Understanding how water and chemicals flow in soils is important for many practical problems such as assessing the risk of groundwater contamination...
Understanding the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere could improve the accuracy of climate models. A new study with Stony Brook University...
Technetium-99 is a common radioactive contaminant in groundwater at nuclear waste reprocessing sites. This study examines ways iron and sulfide...
EMSL director Allison Campbell talks with EMSL scientist Alex Laskin about his research in EMSL's Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme area....

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

Washington State Academy of Sciences’ membership has elected EMSL Chief Scientist Don Baer as a member of the academy for his outstanding scientific achievement and leadership. He will be inducted into the academy in September.
EMSL’s high-performance computing team developed a process to manage the setup of the new Cascade supercomputer, that process was featured in the cover story of the April 2014 LINUX Journal.
ASTM International has selected EMSL’s Don Baer to receive the 2014 Award of Merit, the organization's highest recognition. He earned the award the for his exceptional service to ASTM International Committee E42 on Surface Analysis, innovations in the development of standards for surface analysis and development of new information resources for surface analysis.
Arctic clouds are widespread and play an important role in climate, but different models have produced widely varying predictions about the properties of these clouds. A new study analyzes simulations of Arctic clouds by 11 different models and identifies the key factor responsible for the variable predictions.

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