Quiet Wing

EMSL’s Quiet Wing supports a wide range of research areas, including climate, biological, environmental and energy systems, of importance to the Department of Energy. It is among the most advanced quiet laboratories in the world for high-resolution imaging capabilities.

The Quiet Wing is a unique research environment housing a suite of ultrasensitive microscopy and scanning instruments. It was designed to help accelerate critical science by allowing state-of-the-art ultrasensitive microscopy equipment to operate at optimal resolution. A temperature-controlled facility, the wing’s design eliminates or reduces to a minimum the vibrations, acoustics and electromagnetic noise that can interfere with the resolution of ultrasensitive scientific instrumentation.

The 9,500-square-foot facility features eight quiet laboratory cells and a sample preparation area. The wing currently houses seven microscopy instruments and has room for one more. These microscopes are just a few of the extensive suite of microscopy instruments at EMSL available for scientific inquiry.

EMSL's microscopy capabilities, including those in the Quiet Wing, are available to the scientific community at typically no cost for openly published research. Scientists gain access to instruments and collaborate with onsite microscopy experts through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Learn more about becoming an EMSL user.

Learn more about each instrument and the science it advances on EMSL's YouTube channel and watch the video below on the Quiet Wing.

A new DTEM – Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope – is under development at EMSL in collaboration with scientific colleagues at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. It will be housed in the Quiet Wing. To learn more about this system, the science it will advance and its historical development, visit the DTEM page.

Related information:

Instruments

EMSL's environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) is a state-of-the-art, Cs-corrected field emission gun (FEG) scanning transmission...
Custodian(s): Libor Kovarik
Type of Instrument:
Microscope
The Helium Ion Microscope promises to advance biological, geochemical, biogeochemical, and surface/interface studies using its combined surface...
The JEOL JEM-3000SFF was designed for high-resolution cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of biological samples and expands EMSL/...
EMSL's ultra-high vacuum, low-temperature scanning probe microscope instrument, or UHV LT SPM, is the preeminent system dedicated to surface...
Custodian(s): Igor Lyubinetsky
EMSL's aberration-corrected Titan 80-300™ scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) provides high-resolution imaging with sub-angstrom...
Custodian(s): Chongmin Wang, Scott Lea

Science Highlights

Posted: December 29, 2015
The Science A wide variety of microbes thrive at high temperatures such as those found in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. Archaeal...
Posted: August 17, 2015
The Science With increasing emphasis on sustainable energy sources, lipid-derived biofuels have been proposed as a promising substitute for fossil...
Posted: March 30, 2015
The Science Lipids derived from oil-rich microorganisms such as bacteria, yeast and microalgae offer a promising source of renewable fuels and...
Posted: March 24, 2015
To understand a lithium battery at the nanoscale, scientists with EMSL and other organizations at the Department of Energy’s Joint Center for Energy...
Posted: October 07, 2014
The Science Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and...

Instruments

There are no related projects at this time.

EMSL’s Quiet Wing supports a wide range of research areas, including climate, biological, environmental and energy systems, of importance to the Department of Energy. It is among the most advanced quiet laboratories in the world for high-resolution imaging capabilities.

The Quiet Wing is a unique research environment housing a suite of ultrasensitive microscopy and scanning instruments. It was designed to help accelerate critical science by allowing state-of-the-art ultrasensitive microscopy equipment to operate at optimal resolution. A temperature-controlled facility, the wing’s design eliminates or reduces to a minimum the vibrations, acoustics and electromagnetic noise that can interfere with the resolution of ultrasensitive scientific instrumentation.

The 9,500-square-foot facility features eight quiet laboratory cells and a sample preparation area. The wing currently houses seven microscopy instruments and has room for one more. These microscopes are just a few of the extensive suite of microscopy instruments at EMSL available for scientific inquiry.

EMSL's microscopy capabilities, including those in the Quiet Wing, are available to the scientific community at typically no cost for openly published research. Scientists gain access to instruments and collaborate with onsite microscopy experts through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Learn more about becoming an EMSL user.

Learn more about each instrument and the science it advances on EMSL's YouTube channel and watch the video below on the Quiet Wing.

A new DTEM – Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope – is under development at EMSL in collaboration with scientific colleagues at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. It will be housed in the Quiet Wing. To learn more about this system, the science it will advance and its historical development, visit the DTEM page.

Related information:

Direct Delocalization for Calculating Electron Transfer in Fullerenes.

Abstract: 

A method is introduced for simple calculation of charge transfer between very large solvated organic dimers (fullerenes here) from isolated dimer calculations. The individual monomers in noncentrosymmetric dimers experience different chemical
environments, so that the dimers do not necessarily represent bulk-like molecules. Therefore, we apply a delocalizing bias directly to the Fock matrix of the dimer system, and verify that this is almost as accurate as self-consistent solvation. As large molecules like fullerenes have a plethora of excited states, the initially excited state orbitals are thermally populated, so that the rate is obtained as a thermal average over Marcus thermal transfers.

Citation: 
Arntsen CD, R Reslan, S Hernandez, Y Gao, and D Neuhauser.2013."Direct Delocalization for Calculating Electron Transfer in Fullerenes."International Journal of Quantum Chemistry 113(15):1885–1889. doi:10.1002/qua.24409
Authors: 
CD Arntsen
R Reslan
S Hernez
Y Gao
D Neuhauser
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Publication year: 
2013

Effect of Co/Ni ratios in cobalt nickel mixed oxide catalysts on methane combustion.

Abstract: 

A series of cobalt nickel mixed oxide catalysts with the varying ratios of Co to Ni, prepared by co-precipitation method, were applied to methane combustion. Among the various ratios, cobalt nickel mixed oxides having the ratios of Co to Ni of (50:50) and (67:33) demonstrate the highest activity for methane combustion. Structural analysis obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) evidently demonstrates that CoNi (50:50) and (67:33) samples consist of NiCo2O4and NiO phase and, more importantly, NiCo2O4spinel structure is largely distorted, which is attributed to the insertion of Ni2+ions into octahedral sites in Co3O4spinel structure. Such structural dis-order results in the enhanced portion of surface oxygen species, thus leading to the improved reducibility of the catalysts in the low temperature region as evidenced by temperature programmed reduction by hydrogen (H2TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) O 1s results. They prove that structural disorder in cobalt nickel mixed oxides enhances the catalytic performance for methane combustion. Thus, it is concluded that a strong relationship between structural property and activity in cobalt nickel mixed oxide for methane combustion exists and, more importantly, distorted NiCo2O4spinel structure is found to be an active site for methane combustion.

Citation: 
Lim TH, SJ Cho, HS Yang, MH Engelhard, and DH Kim.2015."Effect of Co/Ni ratios in cobalt nickel mixed oxide catalysts on methane combustion."Applied Catalysis. A, General 505:62-69. doi:10.1016/j.apcata.2015.07.040
Authors: 
H Mark
Lim TH
SJ Cho
HS Yang
MH Engelhard
DH Kim
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Publication year: 
2015

Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters.

Abstract: 

Porous graphene, which is a novel type of defective graphene, shows excellent potential as a support material for metal clusters. In this work, the stability and electronic structures of metal clusters (Pd, Ir, Rh) supported on pristine graphene and graphene with different sizes of nanopore were investigated by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thereafter, CO adsorption and oxidation reaction on the Pd-graphene system were chosen to evaluate its catalytic performance. Graphene with nanopore can strongly stabilize the metal clusters and cause a substantial downshift of the d-band center of the metal clusters, thus decreasing CO adsorption. All binding energies, d-band centers, and adsorption energies show a linear change with the size of the nanopore: a bigger size of nanopore corresponds to a stronger metal clusters bond to the graphene, lower downshift of the d-band center, and weaker CO adsorption. By using a suitable size nanopore, supported Pd clusters on the graphene will have similar CO and O2 adsorption ability, thus leading to superior CO tolerance. The DFT calculated reaction energy barriers show that graphene with nanopore is a superior catalyst for CO oxidation reaction. These properties can play an important role in instructing graphene-supported metal catalyst preparation to prevent the diffusion or agglomeration of metal clusters and enhance catalytic performance. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973Program) (2013CB733501), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21176221, 21136001, 21101137, 21306169, and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

Citation: 
Zhou H, X Chen, L Wang, X Zhong, G Zhuang, X Li, D Mei, and J Wang.2015."Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters."Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. PCCP 17(37):24420-24426. doi:10.1039/c5cp04368a
Authors: 
H Zhou
X Chen
L Wang
X Zhong
G Zhuang
X Li
D Mei
J Wang
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Volume: 
17
Issue: 
37
Pages: 
24420-24426
Publication year: 
2015

Dynamic Structural Changes of SiO2 Supported Pt−Ni Bimetallic Catalysts over Redox Treatments Revealed by NMR and EPR.

Abstract: 

SiO2 supported Pt−Ni bimetallic catalysts with different nickel loadings were prepared and their structural changes after redox treatments were studied by XRD, NMR, and EPR. It is found that the paramagnetic Ni species are mainly located on the surface of silica lattice. The relaxation of detected 29Si nuclei in our samples is mainly governed by a spin-diffusion mechanism. The paramagnetic effects are reflected in the spin−lattice relaxation of Q4 species, with the oxidized samples presenting faster relaxation rates than the corresponding reduced ones. Meanwhile the Q3 species, which are in close contact with the paramagnetic nickel ions, are “spectrally invisible”. In reducing atmosphere Ni gradually diffuses into Pt NPs to form PtNi alloys. While under oxidization treatment, the alloyed Ni atoms migrate outward from the core of Pt NPs and are oxidized. The main EPR spectrum results from reduced nickel species, and the reduced samples show stronger EPR signal than the corresponding oxidized ones. However, in the reduced samples, the superparamagnetic or ferromagnetic metallic Ni particles were inside the PtNi NPs, making their influence on the 29Si relaxation in the SiO2 support weaker than the oxidized samples.

Citation: 
Xu S, ED Walter, Z Zhao, MY Hu, X Han, JZ Hu, and X Bao.2015."Dynamic Structural Changes of SiO2 Supported Pt?Ni Bimetallic Catalysts over Redox Treatments Revealed by NMR and EPR."Journal of Physical Chemistry C 119(36):21219-21226. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b06344
Authors: 
Xu S
ED Walter
Z Zhao
MY Hu
X Han
JZ Hu
X Bao
Capabilities: 
Volume: 
119
Issue: 
36
Pages: 
21219-21226
Publication year: 
2015

Effects of Si/Al Ratio on Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts: Implications for the active Cu species and the Roles of Brønsted Acidity

Abstract: 

Cu/SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios of 6, 12 and 35 were synthesized with Cu incorporation via solution ion exchange. The implications of varying Si/Al ratios on the nature of the multiple Cu species that can be present in the SSZ-13 zeolite are a major focus of this work, as highlighted by the results of a variety of catalyst characterization and reaction kinetics measurements. Specifically, catalysts were characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), NH3 temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and DRIFTS and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties were examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions on selected catalysts under differential conditions. Besides indicating possible variably active multiple Cu species for these reactions, the measurements are also used to untangle some of the complexities caused by the interplay between redox of Cu ion centers and Brønsted acidity. All three reactions appear to follow a redox reaction mechanism, yet the roles of Brønsted acidity are quite different. For NO oxidation, increasing Si/Al ratio lowers Cu redox barriers, thus enhancing reaction rates. Brønsted acidity appears to play essentially no role for this reaction. For standard NH3-SCR, residual Brønsted acidity plays a significant beneficial role at both low- and high-temperature regimes. For NH3 oxidation, no clear trend is observed suggesting both Cu ion center redox and Brønsted acidity play important and perhaps competing roles. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

Citation: 
Gao F, NM Washton, Y Wang, M Kollar, J Szanyi, and CHF Peden.2015."Effects of Si/Al Ratio on Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts: Implications for the active Cu species and the Roles of Brønsted Acidity ."Journal of Catalysis 331:25–38. doi:10.1016/j.jcat.2015.08.004
Authors: 
M Nancy
Janos Szanyi
Gao F
NM Washton
Y Wang
M Kollar
J Szanyi
CHF Peden
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Publication year: 
2015

Isolation of the Copper Redox Steps in the Standard Selective CatalyticReduction on Cu-SSZ-13.

Abstract: 

Operando X-ray absorption experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are reported that elucidate the role of copper redox chemistry in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO over Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. Catalysts prepared to contain only isolated, exchanged CuII ions evidence both CuII and CuI ions under standard SCR conditions at 473 K. Reactant cutoff experiments show that NO and NH3 together are necessary for CuII reduction to CuI. DFT calculations show that NO-assisted NH3 dissociation is both energetically favorable and accounts for the observed CuII reduction. The calculations predict in situ generation of
Brønsted sites proximal to CuI upon reduction, which we quantify in separate titration experiments. Both NO and O2 are necessary for oxidation of CuI to CuII, which DFT suggests to occur by a NO2 intermediate. Reaction of Cu-bound NO2 with
proximal NH4 + completes the catalytic cycle. N2 is produced in both reduction and oxidation half-cycles.

Citation: 
Paolucci C, AA Verma, SA Bates, VF Kispersky, JT Miller, R Gounder, N Delgass, F Ribeiro, and WF Schneider.2014."Isolation of the Copper Redox Steps in the Standard Selective CatalyticReduction on Cu-SSZ-13."Angewandte Chemie International Edition 53(44):11828–11833. doi:10.1002/anie.201407030
Authors: 
C Paolucci
AA Verma
SA Bates
VF Kispersky
JT Miller
R Gounder
N Delgass
F Ribeiro
WF Schneider
Volume: 
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Publication year: 
2014

Nanocrystalline Anatase Titania Supported Vanadia Catalysts: Facet-dependent Structure of Vanadia.

Abstract: 

Titania supported vanadia, a classic heterogeneous catalyst for redox reactions, typically has nonhomogeneous vanadia species on various titania facets, making it challenging not only to determine and quantify each species but also to decouple their catalytic contributions. We prepared truncated tetragonal bipyramidal (TiO2-TTB) and rod-like (TiO2-Rod) anatase titania with only {101} and {001} facets at ratios of about 80:20 and 93:7, respectively, and used them as supports of sub-monolayer vanadia. The structure and redox properties of supported vanadia were determined by XRD, TEM, XPS, EPR, Raman, FTIR and TPR, etc. It was found that vanadia preferentially occupy TiO2 {001} facets and form isolated O=V4+(O-Ti)2 species, and with further increase in vanadia surface coverage, isolated O=V5+(O-Ti)3 and oligomerized O=V5+(O-M)3 (M = Ti or V) species form on TiO2 {101} facets. The discovery on support facet-dependent structure of vanadia on anatase titania is expected to enable the elucidation of structure-function correlations on high surface area TiO2 supported vanadia catalysts. This work was supported by U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. The research was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for DOE by Battelle.

Citation: 
Li WZ, F Gao, Y Li, ED Walter, J Liu, CHF Peden, and Y Wang.2015."Nanocrystalline Anatase Titania Supported Vanadia Catalysts: Facet-dependent Structure of Vanadia."Journal of Physical Chemistry C 119(27):15094?15102. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b01486
Authors: 
D Eric
Yong Wang
Li WZ
F Gao
Y Li
ED Walter
J Liu
CHF Peden
Y Wang
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Publication year: 
2015

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