Quiet Wing

EMSL’s Quiet Wing supports a wide range of research areas, including climate, biological, environmental and energy systems, of importance to the Department of Energy. It is among the most advanced quiet laboratories in the world for high-resolution imaging capabilities.

The Quiet Wing is a unique research environment housing a suite of ultrasensitive microscopy and scanning instruments. It was designed to help accelerate critical science by allowing state-of-the-art ultrasensitive microscopy equipment to operate at optimal resolution. A temperature-controlled facility, the wing’s design eliminates or reduces to a minimum the vibrations, acoustics and electromagnetic noise that can interfere with the resolution of ultrasensitive scientific instrumentation.

The 9,500-square-foot facility features eight quiet laboratory cells and a sample preparation area. The wing currently houses seven microscopy instruments and has room for one more. These microscopes are just a few of the extensive suite of microscopy instruments at EMSL available for scientific inquiry.

EMSL's microscopy capabilities, including those in the Quiet Wing, are available to the scientific community at typically no cost for openly published research. Scientists gain access to instruments and collaborate with onsite microscopy experts through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Learn more about becoming an EMSL user.

Learn more about each instrument and the science it advances on EMSL's YouTube channel and watch the video below on the Quiet Wing.

Related information:

Instruments

The JEOL JEM-3000SFF was designed for high-resolution cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of biological samples and expands EMSL/...
EMSL's ultra-high vacuum, low-temperature scanning probe microscope instrument, or UHV LT SPM, is the preeminent system dedicated to surface...
Custodian(s): Igor Lyubinetsky
EMSL's environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) is a state-of-the-art, Cs-corrected field emission gun (FEG) scanning transmission...
Custodian(s): Libor Kovarik
Type of Instrument:
Microscope
The Helium Ion Microscope promises to advance biological, geochemical, biogeochemical, and surface/interface studies using its combined surface...
EMSL's aberration-corrected Titan 80-300™ scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) provides high-resolution imaging with sub-angstrom...
Custodian(s): Chongmin Wang, Scott Lea

Science Highlights

Posted: October 07, 2014
The Science Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and...
Posted: August 03, 2014
The Science Nanocatalysts consisting of two metals can offer superior performance compared with those made up of only one metal, so they are widely...
Posted: April 15, 2014
Scientists at EMSL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are studying energy storage devices to make them last longer and be able to be...
Posted: March 12, 2014
The Science Lithium-sulfur batteries are promising options for electric vehicles and for storing renewable energy because they can store a lot of...
Posted: March 05, 2014
Lithium-ion batteries fade because the materials lose their structure in response to charging and discharging. This fading relates to electron-rich...

EMSL’s Quiet Wing supports a wide range of research areas, including climate, biological, environmental and energy systems, of importance to the Department of Energy. It is among the most advanced quiet laboratories in the world for high-resolution imaging capabilities.

The Quiet Wing is a unique research environment housing a suite of ultrasensitive microscopy and scanning instruments. It was designed to help accelerate critical science by allowing state-of-the-art ultrasensitive microscopy equipment to operate at optimal resolution. A temperature-controlled facility, the wing’s design eliminates or reduces to a minimum the vibrations, acoustics and electromagnetic noise that can interfere with the resolution of ultrasensitive scientific instrumentation.

The 9,500-square-foot facility features eight quiet laboratory cells and a sample preparation area. The wing currently houses seven microscopy instruments and has room for one more. These microscopes are just a few of the extensive suite of microscopy instruments at EMSL available for scientific inquiry.

EMSL's microscopy capabilities, including those in the Quiet Wing, are available to the scientific community at typically no cost for openly published research. Scientists gain access to instruments and collaborate with onsite microscopy experts through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Learn more about becoming an EMSL user.

Learn more about each instrument and the science it advances on EMSL's YouTube channel and watch the video below on the Quiet Wing.

Related information:

Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2.

Abstract: 

Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.

Citation: 
Yu J, ML Liberton, P Cliften, R Head, JM Jacobs, RD Smith, DW Koppenaal, JJ Brand, and HB Pakrasi.2015."Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2."Scientific Reports 5:8132. doi:10.1038/srep08132
Authors: 
Yu J
ML Liberton
P Cliften
R Head
JM Jacobs
RD Smith
DW Koppenaal
JJ Br
HB Pakrasi
Facility: 
Volume: 
0
Issue: 
0
Pages: 
0
Publication year: 
2015

Conversion of 1,2-Propylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110).

Abstract: 

We have studied the reactions of 1,2-propylene glycol (1,2-PG), DOCH(CH3)CH2OD, on partially reduced, hydroxylated and oxidized TiO2(110) surfaces using temperature programmed desorption. On reduced TiO2(110), propylene, propanal, and acetone are identified as primary carbon-containing products. While the propylene formation channel dominates at low 1,2-PG coverages, all of the above-mentioned products are observed at high coverages. The carbon-containing products are accompanied by the formation of D2O and D2. The observation of only deuterated products shows that the source of hydrogen (D) is from the 1,2-PG hydroxyls. The role of bridging oxygen vacancy (VO) sites was further investigated by titrating them via hydroxylation and oxidation. The results show that hydroxylation does not change the reactivity because the VO sites are regenerated at 500 K, which is a temperature lower than the 1,2-PG product formation temperature. In contrast, surface oxidation causes significant changes in the product distribution, with increased acetone and propanal formation and decreased propylene formation. Additionally D2 is completely eliminated as an observed product at the expense of D2O formation.

Citation: 
Chen L, Z Li, RS Smith, BD Kay, and Z Dohnalek.2014."Conversion of 1,2-Propylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110)."Journal of Physical Chemistry C 118(28):15339-15347. doi:10.1021/jp504770f
Authors: 
L Chen
Z Li
RS Smith
BD Kay
Z Dohnalek
Facility: 
Volume: 
118
Issue: 
28
Pages: 
15339-15347
Publication year: 
2014

Vibronic Raman Scattering at the Quantum Limit of Plasmons.

Abstract: 

We record sequences of Raman spectra at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated with 4,4’-dimercaptostilbene (DMS). A 2D correlation analysis of the recorded trajectories reveals that the observable vibrational states can be divided into sub-sets. The first set comprises the totally symmetric vibrations of DMS (ag) that are neither correlated with each other nor to the fluctuating background, which is assigned to the signature of charge transfer plasmons tunneling through DMS. The second set consists of bu vibrations, which are correlated both with each other and with the continuum. Our findings are rationalized on the basis of the charge-transfer theory of Raman scattering, and illustrate how the tunneling plasmons modulate the vibronic coupling term from which the intensities of the bu states are derived.

Citation: 
El-Khoury PZ, and WP Hess.2014."Vibronic Raman Scattering at the Quantum Limit of Plasmons."Nano Letters 14(7):4114-4118. doi:10.1021/nl501690u
Authors: 
PZ El-Khoury
WP Hess
Facility: 
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
7
Pages: 
4114-4118
Publication year: 
2014

Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations.

Abstract: 

The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products)represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries - pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most. The physico-chemical processes that control the development of this region have a significant impact on the long-term glass-water reaction. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include Geochemical Reaction Path simulations, Glass Reactivity in Allowance for Alteration Layer simulations, Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers; thus providing the fundamental data needed to develop pore-scale equations that enable more accurate predictions of nuclear waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository.

Citation: 
Pierce EM, P Frugier, LJ Criscenti, KD Kwon, and SN Kerisit.2014."Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations."International Journal of Applied Glass Science 5(4):421-435. doi:10.1111/ijag.12077
Authors: 
EM Pierce
P Frugier
LJ Criscenti
KD Kwon
SN Kerisit
Volume: 
5
Issue: 
4
Pages: 
421-435
Publication year: 
2014

Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cylability of Li-O-2 Batteries.

Abstract: 

Extended cycling of the Li-O2 battery under full discharge/charge conditions is achievable upon selection of appropriate electrode materials and cycling protocol. However, the decomposition of the side products also contribute to the observed good cycling behavior of high capacity Li-O2 batteries. Quantitative analyses of the discharge and charge products reveals a quick switch from the predominant formation of Li2O2 to the predominant formation of side products during the first a few cycles of the Li-O2 batteries. After the switch, cycling stabilizes with a repeatable formation of Li2O2/side products at ~1:2 ratio. CNTs/Ru composite electrodes exhibits lower charge voltage and deliver 50 full discharge-charge cycles without sharp capacity drop. Ru coated glass carbon electrode can lead to more than 500 cycles without change in its cycling profiles. The better understanding on Li-O2 reaction processes developed in this work may lead to the further improvement on the long term cycling behavior of high capacity Li-O2 batteries.

Citation: 
Nasybulin EN, W Xu, BL Mehdi, EC Thomsen, MH Engelhard, RC Masse, P Bhattacharya, M Gu, WD Bennett, Z Nie, CM Wang, ND Browning, and J Zhang.2014."Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cylability of Li-O-2 Batteries."ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 6(16):14141-14151. doi:10.1021/am503390q
Authors: 
EN Nasybulin
W Xu
BL Mehdi
EC Thomsen
MH Engelhard
RC Masse
P Bhattacharya
M Gu
WD Bennett
Z Nie
CM Wang
ND Browning
J Zhang
Facility: 
Instruments: 
Volume: 
6
Issue: 
16
Pages: 
14141-14151
Publication year: 
2014

Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films.

Abstract: 

Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO3 as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO3, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

Citation: 
Du Y, H Zhang, T Varga, and SA Chambers.2014."Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films."Applied Physics Letters 105(5):051606. doi:10.1063/1.4892810
Authors: 
Du Y
H Zhang
T Varga
SA Chambers
Volume: 
Issue: 
Pages: 
Publication year: 
2014

Strong Room-temperature Negative Transconductance In An Axial Si/Ge Hetero-nanowire Tunneling Field-effect Transistor.

Abstract: 

We report on room-temperature negative transconductance (NTC) in axial Si/Ge hetero-nanowire tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs). The NTC produces a current peak-to-valley ratio > 45, a high value for a Si-based device. We characterize the NTC characteristics over a range of gate VG and drain VD voltages, finding that NTC persists down to VD = –50 mV. The physical mechanism responsible for the NTC is the VG-induced depletion in the p-Ge section that eventually reduces the maximum electric field that triggers the tunneling ID, as confirmed via three-dimensional TCAD simulations.

Citation: 
Zhang P, ST Le, X Hou, A Zaslavsky, DE Perea, SA Dayeh, and ST Picraux.2014."Strong Room-temperature Negative Transconductance In An Axial Si/Ge Hetero-nanowire Tunneling Field-effect Transistor."Applied Physics Letters 105(6):Article No. 062106. doi:10.1063/1.4892950
Authors: 
P Zhang
ST Le
X Hou
A Zaslavsky
DE Perea
SA Dayeh
ST Picraux
Instruments: 
Volume: 
Issue: 
Pages: 
Publication year: 
2014

Bending-induced Symmetry Breaking of Lithiation in Germanium Nanowires .

Abstract: 

From signal transduction of living cells to oxidation and corrosion of metals, mechanical stress intimately couples with chemical reactions, regulating these biological and physiochemical processes. The coupled effect is particularly evident in electrochemical lithiation/delithiation cycling of high-capacity electrodes, such as silicon (Si), where on one hand lithiation-generated stress mediates lithiation kinetics, and on the other electrochemical reaction rate regulates stress generation and mechanical failure of the electrodes. Here we report for the first time the evidence on the controlled lithiation in germanium nanowires (GeNWs) through external bending. Contrary to the symmetric core-shell lithiation in free-standing GeNWs, we show bending GeNWs breaks the lithiation symmetry, speeding up lithaition at the tensile side while slowing down at the compressive side of the GeNWs. The bending-induced symmetry breaking of lithiation in GeNWs is further corroborated by chemomechanical modeling. In the light of the coupled effect between lithiation kinetics and mechanical stress in the electrochemical cycling, our findings shed light on strain/stress engineering of durable high-rate electrodes and energy harvesting through mechanical motion.

Citation: 
Gu M, H Yang, DE Perea, J Zhang, S Zhang, and CM Wang.2014."Bending-induced Symmetry Breaking of Lithiation in Germanium Nanowires ."Nano Letters 14(8):4622-4627. doi:10.1021/nl501680w
Authors: 
Gu M
H Yang
DE Perea
J Zhang
S Zhang
CM Wang
Facility: 
Instruments: 
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
8
Pages: 
4622-4627
Publication year: 
2014

In-situ Study of Nanostructure and Electrical Resistance of Nanocluster Films Irradiated with Ion Beams.

Abstract: 

An in-situ study is reported on the structural evolution in nanocluster films under He+ ion irradiation using an advanced helium ion microscope. The films consist of loosely interconnected nanoclusters of magnetite or iron-magnetite (Fe-Fe3O4) core-shells. The nanostructure is observed to undergo dramatic changes under ion-beam irradiation, featuring grain growth, phase transition, particle aggregation, and formation of nanowire-like network and nano-pores. Studies based on ion irradiation, thermal annealing and election irradiation have indicated that the major structural evolution is activated by elastic nuclear collisions, while both electronic and thermal processes can play a significant role once the evolution starts. The electrical resistance of the Fe-Fe3O4 films measured in situ exhibits a super-exponential decay with dose. The behavior suggests that the nanocluster films possess an intrinsic merit for development of an advanced online monitor for neutron radiation with both high detection sensitivity and long-term applicability, which can enhance safety measures in many nuclear operations.

Citation: 
Jiang W, JA Sundararajan, T Varga, ME Bowden, Y Qiang, JS McCloy, CH Henager, Jr, and RO Montgomery.2014."In-situ Study of Nanostructure and Electrical Resistance of Nanocluster Films Irradiated with Ion Beams."Advanced Functional Materials 24(39):6210-6218. doi:10.1002/adfm.201400553
Authors: 
W Jiang
JA Sundararajan
T Varga
ME Bowden
Y Qiang
JS McCloy
CH Henager
Jr
RO Montgomery
Instruments: 
Volume: 
24
Issue: 
39
Pages: 
6210-6218
Publication year: 
2014

Characterization of Defects in N-type 4H-SiC After High-Energy N Ion Implantation by RBS-Channeling and Raman Spectroscopy.

Abstract: 

Implantation with 1 MeV N ions was performed at room temperature in n-type 4H-SiC(0001) to four implantation fluences (or doses in dpa (displacements per atom) at the damage peak) of 1.5×1013(0.0034), 7.8×1013(0.018), 1.5×1014(0.034), and 7.8×1014(0.18) ions/cm2, respectively. The evolution of disorder was studied using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling mode (RBS-C) and Raman spectroscopy. The disorder in the Si sub-lattice was found to be less than 10% for the dpa of 0.0034 and 0.0178 and increased to 40% and 60% for the dpa of 0.034 and 0.178 respectively. Raman Spectroscopy was performed using a green laser of wavelength 532 nm as excitation source. The normalized Raman Intensity, In shows disorder of 41%, 69%, 77% and 100% for the dpa of 0.0034, 0.017, 0.034 and 0.178 respectively. In this paper, the characterizations of the defects produced due to the Nitrogen implantation in 4H-SiC are presented and the results are discussed.

Citation: 
Kummari VC, T Reinert, W Jiang, FD McDaniel, and B Rout.2014."Characterization of Defects in N-type 4H-SiC After High-Energy N Ion Implantation by RBS-Channeling and Raman Spectroscopy."Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section B, Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms 332:28-32. doi:10.1016/j.nimb.2014.02.023
Authors: 
VC Kummari
T Reinert
W Jiang
FD McDaniel
B Rout
Instruments: 
Volume: 
Issue: 
Pages: 
Publication year: 
2014

Pages