Quiet Wing

EMSL’s Quiet Wing supports a wide range of research areas, including climate, biological, environmental and energy systems, of importance to the Department of Energy. It is among the most advanced quiet laboratories in the world for high-resolution imaging capabilities.

The Quiet Wing is a unique research environment housing a suite of ultrasensitive microscopy and scanning instruments. It was designed to help accelerate critical science by allowing state-of-the-art ultrasensitive microscopy equipment to operate at optimal resolution. A temperature-controlled facility, the wing’s design eliminates or reduces to a minimum the vibrations, acoustics and electromagnetic noise that can interfere with the resolution of ultrasensitive scientific instrumentation.

The 9,500-square-foot facility features eight quiet laboratory cells and a sample preparation area. The wing currently houses seven microscopy instruments and has room for one more. These microscopes are just a few of the extensive suite of microscopy instruments at EMSL available for scientific inquiry.

EMSL's microscopy capabilities, including those in the Quiet Wing, are available to the scientific community at typically no cost for openly published research. Scientists gain access to instruments and collaborate with onsite microscopy experts through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Learn more about becoming an EMSL user.

Learn more about each instrument and the science it advances on EMSL's YouTube channel and watch the video below on the Quiet Wing.

Related information:

Instruments

The JEOL JEM-3000SFF was designed for high-resolution cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of biological samples and expands EMSL/...
EMSL's ultra-high vacuum, low-temperature scanning probe microscope instrument, or UHV LT SPM, is the preeminent system dedicated to surface...
Custodian(s): Igor Lyubinetsky
EMSL's environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) is a state-of-the-art, Cs-corrected field emission gun (FEG) scanning transmission...
Custodian(s): Libor Kovarik
Type of Instrument:
Microscope
The Helium Ion Microscope promises to advance biological, geochemical, biogeochemical, and surface/interface studies using its combined surface...
EMSL's aberration-corrected Titan 80-300™ scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) provides high-resolution imaging with sub-angstrom...
Custodian(s): Chongmin Wang, Scott Lea

Science Highlights

Posted: March 24, 2015
To understand a lithium battery at the nanoscale, scientists with EMSL and other organizations at the Department of Energy’s Joint Center for Energy...
Posted: October 07, 2014
The Science Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and...
Posted: August 03, 2014
The Science Nanocatalysts consisting of two metals can offer superior performance compared with those made up of only one metal, so they are widely...
Posted: April 15, 2014
Scientists at EMSL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are studying energy storage devices to make them last longer and be able to be...
Posted: March 12, 2014
The Science Lithium-sulfur batteries are promising options for electric vehicles and for storing renewable energy because they can store a lot of...

Instruments

There are no related projects at this time.

EMSL’s Quiet Wing supports a wide range of research areas, including climate, biological, environmental and energy systems, of importance to the Department of Energy. It is among the most advanced quiet laboratories in the world for high-resolution imaging capabilities.

The Quiet Wing is a unique research environment housing a suite of ultrasensitive microscopy and scanning instruments. It was designed to help accelerate critical science by allowing state-of-the-art ultrasensitive microscopy equipment to operate at optimal resolution. A temperature-controlled facility, the wing’s design eliminates or reduces to a minimum the vibrations, acoustics and electromagnetic noise that can interfere with the resolution of ultrasensitive scientific instrumentation.

The 9,500-square-foot facility features eight quiet laboratory cells and a sample preparation area. The wing currently houses seven microscopy instruments and has room for one more. These microscopes are just a few of the extensive suite of microscopy instruments at EMSL available for scientific inquiry.

EMSL's microscopy capabilities, including those in the Quiet Wing, are available to the scientific community at typically no cost for openly published research. Scientists gain access to instruments and collaborate with onsite microscopy experts through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Learn more about becoming an EMSL user.

Learn more about each instrument and the science it advances on EMSL's YouTube channel and watch the video below on the Quiet Wing.

Related information:

1H NMR Metabolomics Study of Metastatic Melanoma in C57BL/6J Mouse Spleen.

Abstract: 

Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Although extensive investigations have been done to study metabolic changes in primary melanoma in vivo and in vitro, little effort has been devoted to metabolic profiling of metastatic tumors in organs other than lymph nodes. In this work, NMR-based metabolomics combined with multivariate data analysis is used to study metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse spleen. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to find important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Two different strategies, i.e., spectral binning and spectral deconvolution, are used to reduce the original spectral data before statistical analysis. Spectral deconvolution is found to be superior for identifying a set of discriminatory metabolites between the control and the melanoma groups, especially when the sample size is small. OPLS results show that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. It is found that taurine, glutamate, aspartate, O-Phosphoethanolamine, niacinamide ,ATP, lipids and glycerol derivatives are decreased statistically and significantly while alanine, malate, xanthine, histamine, dCTP, GTP, thymidine, 2'-Deoxyguanosine are statistically and significantly elevated. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in spleen.

Citation: 
Wang X, MY Hu, J Feng, M Liu, and JZ Hu.2014."1H NMR Metabolomics Study of Metastatic Melanoma in C57BL/6J Mouse Spleen."Metabolomics 10(6):1129-1144. doi:10.1007/s11306-014-0652-z
Authors: 
X Wang
MY Hu
J Feng
M Liu
JZ Hu
Volume: 
10
Issue: 
6
Pages: 
1129-1144
Publication year: 
2014

ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?

Abstract: 

Dual beam depth profiling strategy has been widely adopted in ToF-SIMS depth profiling, in which two basic operation modes, interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode, are commonly used. Generally, interlaced mode is recommended for conductive or semi-conductive samples, whereas non-interlaced mode is recommended for insulating samples, where charge compensation can be an issue. Recent publications, however, show that the interlaced mode can be used effectively for glass depth profiling, despite the fact that glass is an insulator. In this study, we provide a simple guide for choosing between interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode for insulator depth profiling. Two representative cases are presented: (1) depth profiling of a leached glass sample, and (2) depth profiling of a single crystal MgO sample. In brief, the interlaced mode should be attempted first, because (1) it may provide reasonable-quality data, and (2) it is time-saving for most cases, and (3) it introduces low H/C/O background. If data quality is the top priority and measurement time is flexible, non-interlaced mode is recommended because interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity and poor mass resolution. A big challenge is tracking trace H/C/O in a highly insulating sample (e.g., MgO), because non-interlaced mode may introduce strong H/C/O background but interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity. Meanwhile, a C or Au coating is found to be very effective to improve the signal intensity. Surprisingly, the best analyzing location is not on the C or Au coating, but at the edge (outside) of the coating.

Citation: 
Wang Z, K Jin, Y Zhang, F Wang, and Z Zhu.2014."ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?"Surface and Interface Analysis 46(S1):257-260. doi:10.1002/sia.5419
Authors: 
Z Wang
K Jin
Y Zhang
F Wang
Z Zhu
Volume: 
46
Issue: 
0
Pages: 
257-260
Publication year: 
2014

Microstructure of Multistage Annealed Nanocrystalline SmCo2Fe2B Alloy with Enhanced Magnetic Properties.

Abstract: 

The microstructure and chemistry of SmCo2Fe2B melt-spun alloy after multistage annealing was investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and 3D atom probe tomography. The multistage annealing resulted in an increase in both the coercivity and magnetization. The presence of Sm(Co,Fe)4B (1:4:1) and Sm2(Co,Fe)17Bx (2:17:x) magnetic phases were confirmed using both techniques. Fe2B at a scale of ∼5 nm was found by HRTEM precipitating within the 1:4:1 phase after the second-stage annealing. Ordering within the 2:17:x phase was directly identified both by the presence of antiphase boundaries observed by TEM and the interconnected isocomposition surface network found in 3D atom probe results in addition to radial distribution function analysis. The variations in the local chemistry after the secondary annealing were considered pivotal in improving the magnetic properties.

Citation: 
Jiang X, A Devaraj, B Balamurugan, J Cui, and JE Shield.2014."Microstructure of Multistage Annealed Nanocrystalline SmCo2Fe2B Alloy with Enhanced Magnetic Properties."Journal of Applied Physics 115(6):Article No. 063902. doi:10.1063/1.4865298
Authors: 
X Jiang
A Devaraj
B Balamurugan
J Cui
JE Shield
Volume: 
0
Issue: 
0
Pages: 
0
Publication year: 
2014

Impact of a Mixed Oxide’s Surface Composition and Structure on Its Adsorptive Properties: Case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111)

Abstract: 

Characterization of an α-(Fe0.75,Cr0.25)2O3(0001) mixed oxide single crystal surface was conducted using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). After sputter/anneal cleaning in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), the mixed oxide surface became terminated with a magnetite-(111) structure based on the presence of (2x2) spots in LEED and Fe2+ in XPS. The composition of the surface was close to that of M3O4 based on XPS, with the metal (M) content of Fe2+/3+ and Cr3+ being close to 1.4:1, despite the fact that the film’s bulk was 3:1 with respect to the metal cations. The enrichment of the surface with Cr was not altered by high temperature oxidation in UHV, but could be returned to that of the bulk film composition by exposure to the ambient. Adsorption of various probe molecules (NO, O2, CO2 and H2O) was used to identify the active cation sites present in the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) terminated surface. Although XPS and SIMS both indicated that the near-surface region was enriched in Cr3+, no adsorption states typically associated with Cr3+ sites on -Cr2O3 single crystal surfaces were detected. Instead, the TPD behaviors of O2 and CO2 pointed toward the main active sites being Fe2+ and Fe3+, with O2 preferentially adsorbing at the former and CO2 at the latter. NO was observed to bind at both Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites, and H2O TPD looked nearly identical to that for H2O on the Fe3O4(111) surface. Competition for adsorption sites between coadsorbed combinations of CO2, O2, H2O and NO corroborated these assignments. These results indicate that the surface composition of a mixed oxide can vary significantly from its bulk composition depending on the treatment conditions. Even then, the surface composition does not necessarily provide direct insight into the active adsorption sites. In the case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) termination of the α-(Fe0.75,Cr0.25)2O3(0001) surface, Cr3+ cations in the near-surface region appear to be fully coordinated and unavailable for adsorbing molecules. The authors thank Drs. Sara Chamberlin and Scott Chambers for supplying the film used in this work. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Citation: 
Henderson MA, and MH Engelhard.2014."Impact of a Mixed Oxide’s Surface Composition and Structure on Its Adsorptive Properties: Case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) Termination of the ?-(Fe,Cr)2O3(0001) Surface."Journal of Physical Chemistry C 118(50):29058-29067. doi:10.1021/jp5038975
Authors: 
MA Henderson
MH Engelhard
Facility: 
Volume: 
118
Issue: 
50
Pages: 
29058-29067
Publication year: 
2014

Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries.

Abstract: 

Dendrimer-encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles (DEN-Ru) have been used as catalysts in lithium-O2 batteries for the first time. Results obtained from UV-vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the nanoparticles synthesized by the dendrimer template method are ruthenium oxide instead of metallic ruthenium reported earlier by other groups. The DEN-Ru significantly improve the cycling stability of lithium (Li)-O2 batteries with carbon black electrodes and decrease the charging potential even at low catalyst loading. The monodispersity, porosity and large number of surface functionalities of the dendrimer template prevent the aggregation of the ruthenium nanoparticles making their entire surface area available for catalysis. The potential of using DEN-Ru as stand-alone cathode materials for Li-O2 batteries is also explored.

Citation: 
Bhattacharya P, EN Nasybulin, MH Engelhard, L Kovarik, ME Bowden, S Li, DJ Gaspar, W Xu, and J Zhang.2014."Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries."Advanced Functional Materials 24(47):7510-7519. doi:10.1002/adfm.201402701
Authors: 
P Bhattacharya
EN Nasybulin
MH Engelhard
L Kovarik
ME Bowden
S Li
DJ Gaspar
W Xu
J Zhang
Facility: 
Volume: 
24
Issue: 
47
Pages: 
7510-7519
Publication year: 
2014

In Situ Study of CO2 and H2O Partitioning Between Na-Montmorillonite and Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

Abstract: 

Shale formations play fundamental roles in large-scale geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) aimed primarily to mitigate climate change, and in smaller-scale GCS targeted mainly for CO2-enhanced gas recovery operations. In both technologies, CO2 is injected underground as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), where interactions with shale minerals could influence successful GCS implementation. Reactive components of shales include expandable clays, such as montmorillonites and mixed-layer illite/smectite clays. In this work, we used in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy to investigate the swelling/shrinkage and water/CO2 sorption of a pure montmorillonite, Na-SWy-2, when the clay is exposed to variably hydrated scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Measured interlayer spacings and sorbed water concentrations at varying levels of scCO2 hydration are similar to previously reported values measured in air at ambient pressure over a range of relative humidities. IR spectra show evidence of both water and CO2 intercalation, and variations in peak shapes and positions suggest multiple sorbed types with distinct chemical environments. Based on the intensity of the asymmetric CO stretching band of the CO2 associated with the Na-SWy-2, we observed a significant increase in sorbed CO2 as the clay expands from a 0W to a 1W state, suggesting that water props open the interlayer so that CO2 can enter. However, as the clay transitions from a 1W to a 2W state, CO2 desorbs sharply. These observations were placed in the context of two conceptual models concerning hydration mechanisms for expandable clays and were also discussed in light of recent theoretical studies on CO2-H2O-clay interactions. The swelling/shrinkage of expandable clays could affect solid volume, porosity, and permeability of shales. Consequently, the results from this work could aid predictions of shale caprock integrity in large-scale GCS, as well as methane transmissivity in enhanced gas recovery operations.

Citation: 
Loring JS, ES Ilton, J Chen, CJ Thompson, PF Martin, P Benezeth, KM Rosso, AR Felmy, and HT Schaef.2014."In Situ Study of CO2 and H2O Partitioning Between Na-Montmorillonite and Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide."Langmuir 30(21):6120-6128. doi:10.1021/la500682t
Authors: 
JS Loring
ES Ilton
J Chen
CJ Thompson
PF Martin
P Benezeth
KM Rosso
AR Felmy
HT Schaef
Volume: 
30
Issue: 
21
Pages: 
6120-6128
Publication year: 
2014

NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater.

Abstract: 

Currently, nuclear wastes are commonly immobilized into glasses because of their long-term durability. Exposure to water for long periods of time, however, will eventually corrode the waste form and is the leading potential avenue for radionuclide release into the environment. Because such slow processes cannot be experimentally tested, the prediction of release requires a thorough understanding the mechanisms governing glass corrosion. In addition, due to the exceptional durability of glass, much of the testing must be performed on high-surface-area powders. A technique that can provide accurate compositional profiles with very precise depth resolution for non-flat samples would be a major benefit to the field. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling is an excellent tool that has long been used to examine corrosion layers of glass. The roughness of the buried corrosion layers, however, causes the corresponding SIMS depth profiles to exhibit erroneously wide interfaces. In this study, NanoSIMS was used to image the cross-section of the corrosion layers of a leached SON68 glass sample. A wedged crater was prepared by a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain a 5× improvement in depth resolution for NanoSIMS measurements. This increase in resolution allowed us to confirm that the breakdown of the silica glass network is further from the pristine glass than a second dissolution front for boron, another glass former. The existence of these two distinct interfaces, separated by only ~20 nm distance in depth, was not apparent by traditional ToF-SIMS depth profiling but has been confirmed also by atom probe tomography. This novel sample geometry will be a major benefit to efficient NanoSIMS sampling of irregular interfaces at the nanometer scale that would otherwise be obscured within ToF-SIMS depth profiles.

Citation: 
Wang YC, DK Schreiber, JJ Neeway, S Thevuthasan, JE Evans, JV Ryan, Z Zhu, and W Wei.2014."NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater."Surface and Interface Analysis 46(S1):233-237. doi:10.1002/sia.5585
Authors: 
YC Wang
DK Schreiber
JJ Neeway
S Thevuthasan
JE Evans
JV Ryan
Z Zhu
W Wei
Volume: 
46
Issue: 
Pages: 
233-237
Publication year: 
2014

Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine.

Abstract: 

Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim to achieve functional restoration of tissue or cells damaged through disease, aging or trauma. Advancement of tissue engineering requires innovation in the field of 3D scaffolding, and functionalization with bioactive molecules. Nanotechnology offers advanced materials with patterned nano-morphologies for cell growth and different molecular substrates which can support cell survival and functions. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) can control intracellular as well as extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent findings suggest that nanoceria can enhance long-term cell survival, enable cell migration and proliferation, and promote stem cell differentiation. Moreover, the self-regenerative property of nanoceria permits a small dose to remain catalytically active for extended time. This review summarizes the possibilities and applications of nanoceria in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Citation: 
Das S, S Chigurupati, J Dowding, P Munusamy, DR Baer, JF McGinnis, MP Mattson, W Self, and S Seal.2014."Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine."Materials Research Bulletin 39(11):976-983. doi:10.1557/mrs.2014.221
Authors: 
S Das
S Chigurupati
J Dowding
P Munusamy
DR Baer
JF McGinnis
MP Mattson
W Self
S Seal
Volume: 
39
Issue: 
11
Pages: 
976-983
Publication year: 
2014

Effect of Ligands on Characteristics of (CdSe)13 Quantum Dot.

Abstract: 

The widespread applications of quantum dots (QDs) have spurred an increasing interest in the study of their coating ligands, which can not only protect the electronic structures of the central QDs, but also control their permeability through biological membranes with both size and shape. In this work, we have used density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic structures of (CdSe)13 passivated by OPMe2(CH2)nMe ligands with different lengths and various numbers of branches (Me=methyl group, n = 0, 1-3). Our results show that the absorption peak in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra displays a clear blue-shift, on the scale of ~100 nm, upon the binding of ligands. Once the total number of ligands bound with (CdSe)13 reached a saturated number (9 or 10), no more blue-shift occurred in the absorption peak in the UV-vis spectra. On the other hand, the aliphatic chain length of ligands has a negligible effect on the optical properties of the QD core. Analyses of the bonding characteristics confirm that optical transitions are dominantly governed by the central QD core rather than the organic passivation. Interestingly, the density of states (DOS) share similar characteristics as vibrational spectra, even though there is no coordination vibration mode between the ligands and the central QD. These findings might provide insights on the material design for the passivation of quantum dots for biomedical applications.

Citation: 
Gao Y, B Zhou, S Kang, M Xin, P Yang, X Dai, Z Wang, and R Zhou.2014."Effect of Ligands on Characteristics of (CdSe)13 Quantum Dot."RSC Advances 4(52):27146-27151. doi:10.1039/C4RA03202K
Authors: 
Y Gao
B Zhou
S Kang
M Xin
P Yang
X Dai
Z Wang
R Zhou
Facility: 
Instruments: 
Volume: 
4
Issue: 
52
Pages: 
27146-27151
Publication year: 
2014

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