Radiochemistry Annex

EMSL’s Radiochemistry Annex is designed to accelerate scientific discovery and deepen the understanding of the chemical fate and transport of radionuclides in terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems.

The annex offers experimental and computational tools uniquely suited for actinide chemistry studies. The spectroscopic and imaging instruments at this facility are ideally designed for the study of contaminated environmental materials, examination of radionuclide speciation and detection of chemical signatures. The annex houses nuclear magnetic resonance instruments and surface science capabilities, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microscopy, electron microprobe, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Annex users also have access to expert computational, modeling and simulation resources and support.

The annex is an environment where multiple experimental approaches are encouraged. Investigating problems at an integrated, cross-disciplinary level encourages holistic understanding, which ultimately provides policy makers the information they need to make sound remediation choices.

Like all of EMSL's capabilities, those housed in the annex are available to the scientific community at typically no cost for openly published research. Scientists gain access to instruments and collaborate with onsite microscopy experts through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Research conducted in the annex requires special information and handling. Prior to submitting a proposal, potential users should familiarize themselves with the guidance for using and shipping radioactive material to the annex.

Radiochemistry Annex videos on EMSL's YouTube channel - Learn about the individual instruments in the Radiochemistry Annex and specifically how they advance subsurface and terrestrial ecosystem science.

And don't miss the virtual tour of our Radiochemistry Annex.

Additional Information:

Instruments

Housed in EMSL's Radiochemistry Annex, the field emission electron microprobe (EMP) enables chemical analysis and imaging of radionuclides with high...
Custodian(s): Bruce Arey
EMSL's Digital Instruments Radiological BioScope™ Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) allows radiological samples to be examined in fluids or air with...
Custodian(s): Kevin M. Rosso
Research applications Samples containing paramagnetics Soils (SOM and NOM) Metal oxide materials for catalysis applications Researchers may operate...
Custodian(s): Nancy Washton, Sarah D Burton
EMSL's Bruker wide-bore 750 MHz solids/liquids/imaging spectrometer is dedicated to radiological and environmental samples. Housed in the EMSL...
Custodian(s): Nancy Washton
The Bruker EMX electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer performs continuous-wave magnetic resonance using electron spins to selectively...
Custodian(s): Eric Walter

Science Highlights

Posted: July 06, 2011
Scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Rai Enviro-Chem, LLC, recently published first-ever results that illustrate the importance...

Instruments

There are no related projects at this time.

EMSL’s Radiochemistry Annex is designed to accelerate scientific discovery and deepen the understanding of the chemical fate and transport of radionuclides in terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems.

The annex offers experimental and computational tools uniquely suited for actinide chemistry studies. The spectroscopic and imaging instruments at this facility are ideally designed for the study of contaminated environmental materials, examination of radionuclide speciation and detection of chemical signatures. The annex houses nuclear magnetic resonance instruments and surface science capabilities, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microscopy, electron microprobe, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Annex users also have access to expert computational, modeling and simulation resources and support.

The annex is an environment where multiple experimental approaches are encouraged. Investigating problems at an integrated, cross-disciplinary level encourages holistic understanding, which ultimately provides policy makers the information they need to make sound remediation choices.

Like all of EMSL's capabilities, those housed in the annex are available to the scientific community at typically no cost for openly published research. Scientists gain access to instruments and collaborate with onsite microscopy experts through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Research conducted in the annex requires special information and handling. Prior to submitting a proposal, potential users should familiarize themselves with the guidance for using and shipping radioactive material to the annex.

Radiochemistry Annex videos on EMSL's YouTube channel - Learn about the individual instruments in the Radiochemistry Annex and specifically how they advance subsurface and terrestrial ecosystem science.

And don't miss the virtual tour of our Radiochemistry Annex.

Additional Information:

1H NMR Metabolomics Study of Metastatic Melanoma in C57BL/6J Mouse Spleen.

Abstract: 

Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Although extensive investigations have been done to study metabolic changes in primary melanoma in vivo and in vitro, little effort has been devoted to metabolic profiling of metastatic tumors in organs other than lymph nodes. In this work, NMR-based metabolomics combined with multivariate data analysis is used to study metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse spleen. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to find important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Two different strategies, i.e., spectral binning and spectral deconvolution, are used to reduce the original spectral data before statistical analysis. Spectral deconvolution is found to be superior for identifying a set of discriminatory metabolites between the control and the melanoma groups, especially when the sample size is small. OPLS results show that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. It is found that taurine, glutamate, aspartate, O-Phosphoethanolamine, niacinamide ,ATP, lipids and glycerol derivatives are decreased statistically and significantly while alanine, malate, xanthine, histamine, dCTP, GTP, thymidine, 2'-Deoxyguanosine are statistically and significantly elevated. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in spleen.

Citation: 
Wang X, MY Hu, J Feng, M Liu, and JZ Hu.2014."1H NMR Metabolomics Study of Metastatic Melanoma in C57BL/6J Mouse Spleen."Metabolomics 10(6):1129-1144. doi:10.1007/s11306-014-0652-z
Authors: 
X Wang
MY Hu
J Feng
M Liu
JZ Hu
Volume: 
10
Issue: 
6
Pages: 
1129-1144
Publication year: 
2014

ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?

Abstract: 

Dual beam depth profiling strategy has been widely adopted in ToF-SIMS depth profiling, in which two basic operation modes, interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode, are commonly used. Generally, interlaced mode is recommended for conductive or semi-conductive samples, whereas non-interlaced mode is recommended for insulating samples, where charge compensation can be an issue. Recent publications, however, show that the interlaced mode can be used effectively for glass depth profiling, despite the fact that glass is an insulator. In this study, we provide a simple guide for choosing between interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode for insulator depth profiling. Two representative cases are presented: (1) depth profiling of a leached glass sample, and (2) depth profiling of a single crystal MgO sample. In brief, the interlaced mode should be attempted first, because (1) it may provide reasonable-quality data, and (2) it is time-saving for most cases, and (3) it introduces low H/C/O background. If data quality is the top priority and measurement time is flexible, non-interlaced mode is recommended because interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity and poor mass resolution. A big challenge is tracking trace H/C/O in a highly insulating sample (e.g., MgO), because non-interlaced mode may introduce strong H/C/O background but interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity. Meanwhile, a C or Au coating is found to be very effective to improve the signal intensity. Surprisingly, the best analyzing location is not on the C or Au coating, but at the edge (outside) of the coating.

Citation: 
Wang Z, K Jin, Y Zhang, F Wang, and Z Zhu.2014."ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?"Surface and Interface Analysis 46(S1):257-260. doi:10.1002/sia.5419
Authors: 
Z Wang
K Jin
Y Zhang
F Wang
Z Zhu
Volume: 
46
Issue: 
0
Pages: 
257-260
Publication year: 
2014

Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Under Heavy Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography.

Abstract: 

14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 °C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 × 1023 to 3.6 × 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

Citation: 
He J, F Wan, K Sridharan, TR Allen, AG Certain, V Shutthanandan, and Y Wu.2014."Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Under Heavy Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography."Journal of Nuclear Materials 455(1-3):41-45. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2014.03.024
Authors: 
He J
F Wan
K Sridharan
TR Allen
AG Certain
V Shutthanan
Y Wu
Instruments: 
Volume: 
455
Issue: 
0
Pages: 
41-45
Publication year: 
2014

The Effect of Eectronic Energy Loss on Irradiation-Induced Grain Growth in Nanocrystalline Oxides.

Abstract: 

Grain growth of nanocrystalline materials is generally thermally activated, but can also be driven by irradiation at much lower temperature. In nanocrystalline ceria and zirconia, contributions from both displacement damage and ionization to the grain growth are identified. Our atomistic simulations have revealed fast grain boundary (GB) movements due to the high density of disorder near GBs. Our experimental results have shown that irradiation-induced grain growth is a function of total energy deposited, where the excitation of target electrons and displacement of lattice atoms both contribute to the overall disorder and both play important roles in grain growth. The coupling of energy deposition to the electronic and lattice structures should both be taken into consideration when engineering nanostructural materials.

Citation: 
Zhang Y, DS Aidhy, T Varga, S Moll, PD Edmondson, F Namavar, K Jin, CN Ostrouchov, and WJ Weber.2014."The Effect of Eectronic Energy Loss on Irradiation-Induced Grain Growth in Nanocrystalline Oxides."Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. PCCP 16(17):8051-8059. doi:10.1039/c4cp00392f
Authors: 
Y Zhang
DS Aidhy
T Varga
S Moll
PD Edmondson
F Namavar
K Jin
CN Ostrouchov
WJ Weber
Volume: 
16
Issue: 
17
Pages: 
8051-8059
Publication year: 
2014

Microstructure of Multistage Annealed Nanocrystalline SmCo2Fe2B Alloy with Enhanced Magnetic Properties.

Abstract: 

The microstructure and chemistry of SmCo2Fe2B melt-spun alloy after multistage annealing was investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and 3D atom probe tomography. The multistage annealing resulted in an increase in both the coercivity and magnetization. The presence of Sm(Co,Fe)4B (1:4:1) and Sm2(Co,Fe)17Bx (2:17:x) magnetic phases were confirmed using both techniques. Fe2B at a scale of ∼5 nm was found by HRTEM precipitating within the 1:4:1 phase after the second-stage annealing. Ordering within the 2:17:x phase was directly identified both by the presence of antiphase boundaries observed by TEM and the interconnected isocomposition surface network found in 3D atom probe results in addition to radial distribution function analysis. The variations in the local chemistry after the secondary annealing were considered pivotal in improving the magnetic properties.

Citation: 
Jiang X, A Devaraj, B Balamurugan, J Cui, and JE Shield.2014."Microstructure of Multistage Annealed Nanocrystalline SmCo2Fe2B Alloy with Enhanced Magnetic Properties."Journal of Applied Physics 115(6):Article No. 063902. doi:10.1063/1.4865298
Authors: 
X Jiang
A Devaraj
B Balamurugan
J Cui
JE Shield
Volume: 
0
Issue: 
0
Pages: 
0
Publication year: 
2014

In Situ Study of CO2 and H2O Partitioning Between Na-Montmorillonite and Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

Abstract: 

Shale formations play fundamental roles in large-scale geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) aimed primarily to mitigate climate change, and in smaller-scale GCS targeted mainly for CO2-enhanced gas recovery operations. In both technologies, CO2 is injected underground as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), where interactions with shale minerals could influence successful GCS implementation. Reactive components of shales include expandable clays, such as montmorillonites and mixed-layer illite/smectite clays. In this work, we used in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy to investigate the swelling/shrinkage and water/CO2 sorption of a pure montmorillonite, Na-SWy-2, when the clay is exposed to variably hydrated scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Measured interlayer spacings and sorbed water concentrations at varying levels of scCO2 hydration are similar to previously reported values measured in air at ambient pressure over a range of relative humidities. IR spectra show evidence of both water and CO2 intercalation, and variations in peak shapes and positions suggest multiple sorbed types with distinct chemical environments. Based on the intensity of the asymmetric CO stretching band of the CO2 associated with the Na-SWy-2, we observed a significant increase in sorbed CO2 as the clay expands from a 0W to a 1W state, suggesting that water props open the interlayer so that CO2 can enter. However, as the clay transitions from a 1W to a 2W state, CO2 desorbs sharply. These observations were placed in the context of two conceptual models concerning hydration mechanisms for expandable clays and were also discussed in light of recent theoretical studies on CO2-H2O-clay interactions. The swelling/shrinkage of expandable clays could affect solid volume, porosity, and permeability of shales. Consequently, the results from this work could aid predictions of shale caprock integrity in large-scale GCS, as well as methane transmissivity in enhanced gas recovery operations.

Citation: 
Loring JS, ES Ilton, J Chen, CJ Thompson, PF Martin, P Benezeth, KM Rosso, AR Felmy, and HT Schaef.2014."In Situ Study of CO2 and H2O Partitioning Between Na-Montmorillonite and Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide."Langmuir 30(21):6120-6128. doi:10.1021/la500682t
Authors: 
JS Loring
ES Ilton
J Chen
CJ Thompson
PF Martin
P Benezeth
KM Rosso
AR Felmy
HT Schaef
Volume: 
30
Issue: 
21
Pages: 
6120-6128
Publication year: 
2014

NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater.

Abstract: 

Currently, nuclear wastes are commonly immobilized into glasses because of their long-term durability. Exposure to water for long periods of time, however, will eventually corrode the waste form and is the leading potential avenue for radionuclide release into the environment. Because such slow processes cannot be experimentally tested, the prediction of release requires a thorough understanding the mechanisms governing glass corrosion. In addition, due to the exceptional durability of glass, much of the testing must be performed on high-surface-area powders. A technique that can provide accurate compositional profiles with very precise depth resolution for non-flat samples would be a major benefit to the field. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling is an excellent tool that has long been used to examine corrosion layers of glass. The roughness of the buried corrosion layers, however, causes the corresponding SIMS depth profiles to exhibit erroneously wide interfaces. In this study, NanoSIMS was used to image the cross-section of the corrosion layers of a leached SON68 glass sample. A wedged crater was prepared by a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain a 5× improvement in depth resolution for NanoSIMS measurements. This increase in resolution allowed us to confirm that the breakdown of the silica glass network is further from the pristine glass than a second dissolution front for boron, another glass former. The existence of these two distinct interfaces, separated by only ~20 nm distance in depth, was not apparent by traditional ToF-SIMS depth profiling but has been confirmed also by atom probe tomography. This novel sample geometry will be a major benefit to efficient NanoSIMS sampling of irregular interfaces at the nanometer scale that would otherwise be obscured within ToF-SIMS depth profiles.

Citation: 
Wang YC, DK Schreiber, JJ Neeway, S Thevuthasan, JE Evans, JV Ryan, Z Zhu, and W Wei.2014."NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater."Surface and Interface Analysis 46(S1):233-237. doi:10.1002/sia.5585
Authors: 
YC Wang
DK Schreiber
JJ Neeway
S Thevuthasan
JE Evans
JV Ryan
Z Zhu
W Wei
Volume: 
46
Issue: 
Pages: 
233-237
Publication year: 
2014

Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine.

Abstract: 

Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim to achieve functional restoration of tissue or cells damaged through disease, aging or trauma. Advancement of tissue engineering requires innovation in the field of 3D scaffolding, and functionalization with bioactive molecules. Nanotechnology offers advanced materials with patterned nano-morphologies for cell growth and different molecular substrates which can support cell survival and functions. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) can control intracellular as well as extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent findings suggest that nanoceria can enhance long-term cell survival, enable cell migration and proliferation, and promote stem cell differentiation. Moreover, the self-regenerative property of nanoceria permits a small dose to remain catalytically active for extended time. This review summarizes the possibilities and applications of nanoceria in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Citation: 
Das S, S Chigurupati, J Dowding, P Munusamy, DR Baer, JF McGinnis, MP Mattson, W Self, and S Seal.2014."Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine."Materials Research Bulletin 39(11):976-983. doi:10.1557/mrs.2014.221
Authors: 
S Das
S Chigurupati
J Dowding
P Munusamy
DR Baer
JF McGinnis
MP Mattson
W Self
S Seal
Volume: 
39
Issue: 
11
Pages: 
976-983
Publication year: 
2014

Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions.

Abstract: 

Radionuclide 137Cs is one of the major fission products that dominate heat generation in spent fuels over the first 300 hundred years. A durable waste form for 137Cs that decays to 137Ba is needed to minimize its environmental impact. Aluminosilicate pollucite CsAlSi2O6 is selected as a model waste form to study the decay-induced structural effects. While Ba-containing precipitates are not present in charge-balanced Cs0.9Ba0.05AlSi2O6, they are found in Cs0.9Ba0.1AlSi2O6 and identified as monoclinic Ba2Si3O8. Pollucite is susceptible to electron irradiation induced amorphization. The threshold density of the electronic energy deposition for amorphization is determined to be ~235 keV/nm3. Pollucite can be readily amorphized under F+ ion irradiation at 673 K. A significant amount of Cs diffusion and release from the amorphized pollucite is observed during the irradiation. However, cesium is immobile in the crystalline structure under He+ ion irradiation at room temperature. The critical temperature for amorphization is not higher than 873 K under F+ ion irradiation. If kept at or above 873 K all the time, the pollucite structure is unlikely to be amorphized; Cs diffusion and release are improbable. A general discussion regarding pollucite as a potential waste form is provided in this report.

Citation: 
Jiang W, L Kovarik, Z Zhu, T Varga, MH Engelhard, ME Bowden, TM Nenoff, and T Garino.2014."Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions."Journal of Physical Chemistry C 118(31):18160-18169. doi:10.1021/jp5045223
Authors: 
W Jiang
L Kovarik
Z Zhu
T Varga
MH Engelhard
ME Bowden
TM Nenoff
T Garino
Instruments: 
Volume: 
118
Issue: 
31
Pages: 
18160-18169
Publication year: 
2014

Mobilization of Metals from Eau Claire Siltstone and the Impact of Oxygen under Geological Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

Abstract: 

Geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) has been proposed as a viable strategy to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emission; however, the increased cost that will be incurred by fossil energy production facilities is a deterrent to implementation of this technology. Allowing impurities in the effluent CO2 stream could result in significant financial and energy savings for CO2 capture and separation. However, impurities such as O2 have the potential to influence the redox state and alter the geochemical interactions that occur within GCS reservoirs, which increases the concern for CO2 and brine leakage from the storage reservoir as well as the overlying groundwater contamination. In this work, to investigate the impact of O2 co-injected with CO2 on the geochemical interactions, especially the trace metal mobilization from a GCS reservoir rock, batch studies were conducted with Eau Claire siltstone collected from CO2 sequestration sites. The rock was reacted with synthetic brines in contact with either 100% CO2 or a mixture of 95 mole% CO2-5 mole% O2 at 10.1 MPa and 75 °C. Both microscopic and spectroscopic measurements, including 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and chemical extraction were combined in this study to investigate reaction mechanisms. The Eau Claire siltstone contains quartz (52 wt%), fluorapatite (40%), and aluminosilicate (5%) as major components, and dolomite (2%), pyrite (1%), and small-particle-/poorly-crystalline Fe-oxides as minor components. With the introduction of CO2 into the reaction vessel containing rock and brine, the leaching of small amounts of fluorapatite, aluminosilicate, and dolomite occurred. Trace metals of environmental concern, including Pb, As, Cd, and Cu were detected in the leachate with concentrations up to 400 ppb in the CO2-brine-rock reaction system within 30 days. In the presence of O2, the mobilization of Pb, Cd, and Cu was significantly enhanced, whereas As concentrations decreased, compared with the reaction system without oxygen. The presence of oxygen resulted in the formation of secondary Fe-oxides which appear to be Fe(II)-substituted P-containing ferrihydrite. Although the rock contained only 1.04 wt% total Fe, oxidative dissolution of pyrite, leaching and oxidation of structural Fe(II) in fluorapatite, and precipitation of Fe-oxides significantly decreased the pH in brine with oxygen(pH 3.3-3.7), compared with the reaction system without oxygen (pH 4.2-4.4). In the CO2-rock-brine system without O2, the majority of As remained in the rock, with about 1.1% of the total As being released from intrinsic Fe-oxides to the aqueous phase. The release behavior of As to solution was consistent with competitive adsorption between phosphate/fluoride and As on Fe-oxide surfaces. In the presence of O2 the mobility of As was reduced due to enhanced adsorption onto both intrinsic and secondary Fe-oxide surfaces.When O2 was present, the dominant species in solution was the less toxic As(V). This work will advance our understanding of the geochemical reaction mechanisms that occur under GCS conditions and help to evaluate the risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration.

Citation: 
Shao H, RK Kukkadapu, EJ Krogstad, MK Newburn, and KJ Cantrell.2014."Mobilization of Metals from Eau Claire Siltstone and the Impact of Oxygen under Geological Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Conditions."Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 141:62-82. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2014.06.011
Authors: 
H Shao
RK Kukkadapu
EJ Krogstad
MK Newburn
KJ Cantrell
Capabilities: 
Volume: 
Issue: 
Pages: 
Publication year: 
2014

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